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Whatcom Middle School is committed to providing our students educational experiences that promote lifelong learning.  We are dedicated to helping students develop skills needed to reason, communicate, collaborate, and make healthy choices in a safe and respectful environment.

Whatcom provides a safe, challenging and nurturing learning environment. The input and support Whatcom receives from staff, families and community members continues to make the education of our students a success.

We focus on identifying the individual learning needs of our students and personalizing instruction so that every child exceeds his or her potential. We want all students to know that going to college is possible and, as children in middle school, to set their sights on the future. We are working constantly to improve what and how we teach so that students experience positive and successful transitions to high school and beyond.

History

Whatcom was first constructed in 1903, making it the oldest existing school building in the Bellingham School District.  Also known as North Side of Bellingham High, Whatcom High School received a large addition in 1916, tripling its size.  In 1937, it became Whatcom Junior High.  In 1967, it became Whatcom Middle School. A fire devastated Whatcom Middle School on Nov. 5, 2009. In February 2011, Superintendent Greg Baker announced that Whatcom would reopen one year earlier than projected. This expedited reopening is only feasible because of a team approach with this project by district office staff, Dawson Construction, the structural engineering firm of Reid Middleton, the architectural firm Dykeman, the insurance providers, and the City of Bellingham. The school reopened in Fall 2011.

Emergency and Safety Information

Keeping our students and staff safe at school is a top priority. Bellingham Public Schools coordinates with all local emergency responders to ensure our procedures and plans for fire, earthquake, lockdowns and other drills are current and reflect best practices for student safety.

What to do in an emergency »